Programming

Programming can be tricky business. Avoid pitfalls and costly mistakes by knowing what is required for the development of your website. We provide an in-depth analysis of your site needs, from the ground up. Whether your site requires a content management system (CMS) or a custom built site from scratch, we can accommodate.

In addition to Responsive and CSS programming, we also offer programming for Apps, Retail sites, B-to-B sites, Content sites, Affiliate Programs, and Paysites. We offer e-book setup and submissions, too!

We use the following programming languages and softwares:

App Development
HTML/XHTML
CSS
PHP
MySQL
Smarty Templating

jQuery
Bootstrap
WordPress
Shopify
Drupal
Magento

Additional Services

Marketing

Marketing

Branding

Branding

Graphic Design

Graphic Design

SEO

SEO

Public Relations

Public Relations

Programming Articles

18Dec 13
WordPress: A Wolf In Sheep’s Clothing?

WordPress: A Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing?

Everyone wants to use Wordpress. Wordpress! Wordpress! Yay! Yay! Yay! It's free, it's easy, it's... sometimes very problematic. I'll be the first to admit I love Wordpress. I love the shit out of it. But there are times when it isn't appropriate to use. Wordpress wasn't meant to perform all of the robust features and functions we try to glean from it. It is but a humble blog that was SO awesome that folks saw potential there. That potential is valid as long as you don't try to get too crazy with it. As a general rule of thumb Wordpress works great if you are simply displaying content (text, images, videos), or selling product or services via PayPal. Heck, I'll even go so far as to say Woo Commerce might serve you well if you really want to put a retail module in place on your site. But that's it - That's as far as you should go with Wordpress. When you make Wordpress do things it wasn't meant to do, it creates huge problems later. Problems you can't always see in the beginning. Plugins tend to be the culprit in many cases. If you're having trouble, look to thy…

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11Jul 13
Naming%20Conventions

Naming%20Conventions

Yeah. Spaces happen. Then you get that ugly "%20". Naming conventions for your files are very important. It is best to employ a simple, systematic naming convention for all your daily files. Whether you're keeping track of content, site slices, whatever... There are a few rules of thumb that can avoid issues later on. 1. Spaces. Just forget the spacebar exists on your computer. If you must have space, use an underscore "_". This will avoid issues such as uploading files to a server or directory paths to images on a website. Also avoid non-standard characters like: ' & ; When a space occurs, you get the "%20" and the path can't be followed, leaving you with broken links or bad FTP uploads that disappear. 2. File names and their length. I have seen some image files on websites that have over 100 characters in the file names. WTF!? Seriously folks... Try to keep the file names as short and to-the-point as possible. When slicing up a site, I execute a very page-specific naming convention that potentially allows all the images to reside in the root images directory if they had to. Every sliced file name becomes a mini-directory about…

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09Apr 13
Resolution For Print And Web

Resolution for Print and Web

You can't use your low resolution logo from the web to have printing done. Forget about it. Only Chuck Norris can do this successfully. You need to have the right resolution for print and web for best results. Bitmapped images are made up of pixels, the smallest unit a computer can display data. When digitizing an image, you will need to select the desired amount of pixels per inch (PPI) or dots per inch (DPI), depending on what you want to do with the image. Incidentally, PPI (web) and DPI (print) are interchangeable terms, meaning essentially the same thing. Web = 72 DPI Print = 300 DPI* *You can go down to 250 DPI in some cases until the naked eye will see degradation in the image. Large format printing is usually done between 100-150 DPI (posters, banners, tradeshow booths, billboards). Most large format printing is not meant for someone to be standing up close to it. Up close, the images will not look as sharp and you will see the dot from the print. But from a distance, the image will look fine. This is where vector art can come in real handy. Vector can go large format and…

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